Planet Knowledge

Planet Knowledge is a free to watch video on demand channel on Freeview HD, Youview and Smart TV’s – On channel 265. Also available for all leading smartphones and tablets using iOS and Android.

Latest Shows

The Wonder List with Bill Weir

Bill Weir takes a journey to some of the most fascinating locations in the world to experience amazing cultures, people and creatures at a crossroads.


Episode Length: 00:40:00
Year: 2011
Episodes: 8


This documentary is available to watch for FREE on Planet Knowledge, a free to watch video on demand channel on Freeview HD (Channel 265), Youview, Samsung connected TV’s, selected smart TV’s, tablets and smartphones using Android or iOS.

  

Nazi Quest for the Holy Grail

In April of 1945, at the end of the Second World War, just days after Hitler’s suicide, a small detachment of American troops discovered a vast cache of mysterious Nazi files hidden in a cave in Southern Germany. Contained in the documents was the key to unlocking one of the Nazis’ most shadowy projects: a hunt to discover a lost civilisation and the ancient knowledge it once possessed. This is the story of the Nazis’ quest to re-discover the lost Aryan race and retrieve their forgotten secrets – including the Holy Grail.

Under the command of Heinrich Himmler, it was a project that launched archaeological expeditions to remote and mysterious sites all across the globe. It begins with a search for the lost island of Atlantis and a quest to find the Holy Grail, and ends with one of the worst crimes of the Holocaust.


Episode Length: 00:45:00
Year: 2013
Episodes: 1


This documentary is available to watch for FREE on Planet Knowledge, a free to watch video on demand channel on Freeview HD (Channel 265), Youview, Samsung connected TV’s, selected smart TV’s, tablets and smartphones using Android or iOS.

  

Nature Shock

An examination of freak occurrences in the natural world. Whether it’s animals behaving oddly or even the planet that perplexes, scientists study baffling phenomena in a bid to understand what Mother Nature is really up to.


Episode Length: 00:45:00
Year: 2013
Episodes: 4


This documentary is available to watch for FREE on Planet Knowledge, a free to watch video on demand channel on Freeview HD (Channel 265), Youview, Samsung connected TV’s, selected smart TV’s, tablets and smartphones using Android or iOS.

  

Space Shuttle: Final Countdown

July 21, 2011 marked the end of the space shuttle program, and with it, the end of an era. Over the last 30 years, the shuttles Atlantis, Columbia, Challenger, Discovery and Endeavour have had an enormous impact on humanity, evoking tears of wonder and sorrow, and transforming our understanding of our universe and our planet. Prepare for liftoff as we explore the shuttle program’s extraordinary legacy, featuring rare, archival footage and compelling testimonies from the astronauts, NASA scientists, and designers who made it all possible.


Episode Length: 00:45:00

Year: 2011

Episodes: 1


This documentary is available to watch for FREE on Planet Knowledge, a free to watch video on demand channel on Freeview HD (Channel 265), Youview, Samsung connected TV’s, selected smart TV’s, tablets and smartphones using Android or iOS.

  

Death Row Stories

“Each episode of Death Row Stories will unravel a different capital murder case that has twists and turns worthy of a crime thriller.
All of these stories are true, and call into question the myriad of beliefs about the death penalty and the American justice system itself.”


Episode Length: 00:45:00

Year: 2015

Episodes: 8


This documentary is available to watch for FREE on Planet Knowledge, a free to watch video on demand channel on Freeview HD (Channel 265), Youview, Samsung connected TV’s, selected smart TV’s, tablets and smartphones using Android or iOS.

  

Stonehenge may have been built using lard

Pig fat could have been used to grease the sledges used to transport the massive stones of Stonehenge into position, new analysis by archaeologists at Newcastle University has suggested.

Fat residues on shards of pottery found at Durrington Walls, near Stonehenge, have long been assumed to be connected with feeding the many hundreds of people that came from across Britain to help construct the ancient monument.

But, new analysis by archaeologists at Newcastle University, UK, suggests that because the fragments came from dishes that would have been the size and shape of buckets, not cooking or serving dishes, they could have been used for the collection and storage of tallow – a form of animal fat.

Dr Lisa-Marie Shillito, Senior Lecturer in Landscape Archaeology, Newcastle University, said: “I was interested in the exceptional level of preservation and high quantities of lipids – or fatty residues – we recovered from the pottery. I wanted to know more about why we see these high quantities of pig fat in pottery, when the animal bones that have been excavated at the site show that many of the pigs were ‘spit roasted’ rather than chopped up as you would expect if they were being cooked in the pots.”

‘Greased sled’ theory

It is now generally accepted that the huge megaliths that make up Stonehenge were moved by human effort. Recent experiments have suggested that the stones – up to eight metres high and weighing as much as two tonnes – could have been moved by 20 people by placing them on a sled and sliding them over logs.

The pottery at Durrington Walls is one of the best studied for organic residues, with over 300 shards having been analysed as part of wider studies of Grooved Ware use in Britain, and more recently the Feeding Stonehenge project, on which Dr Shillito worked.

Analysis of residues of absorbed fat is a well-established technique for revealing what foods different type of pottery was used for. But more attention needs to be paid to how this information is interpreted, Dr Shillito argues.

“There are still many unanswered questions surrounding the construction of Stonehenge”, she says. “Until now, there has been a general assumption that the traces of animal fat absorbed by these pieces of pottery were related to the cooking and consumption of food, and this steered initial interpretations in that direction. But there may have been other things going on as well, and these residues could be tantalising evidence of the greased sled theory.

“Archaeological interpretations of pottery residues can sometimes only give us part of the picture. We need to think about the wider context of what else we know and take a ‘multi-proxy’ approach to identify other possibilities if we hope to get a better understanding.”

Newcastle University

Header Image – CC Public Domain

The Growing Pains Of A Teenage Genius

Documentary about 13-year-old Cameron, a socially-awkward maths genius with Asperger Syndrome who is trying to balance his ability with the classic teenage longing to be accepted.


Episode Length: 00:45:00

Year: 2012

Episodes: 1


This documentary is available to watch for FREE on Planet Knowledge, a free to watch video on demand channel on Freeview HD (Channel 265), Youview, Samsung connected TV’s, selected smart TV’s, tablets and smartphones using Android or iOS.

  

The Somme

Drama-documentary recounting the events of the 1st July 1916 and the Battle of the Somme on the Western Front during the First World War. Told through the letters and journals of soldiers who were there.

The Battle of the Somme, also known as the Somme Offensive, was a battle of the First World War fought by the armies of the British Empire and French Third Republic against the German Empire. It took place between 1 July and 18 November 1916 on both sides of the upper reaches of the River Somme in France.

The battle was intended to hasten a victory for the Allies and was the largest battle of the First World War on the Western Front.[7] More than three million men fought in the battle and one million men were wounded or killed, making it one of the bloodiest battles in human history.[8] Trench warfare gave the Germans an advantage because they dug their trenches deeper than the Allied forces which gave them a better line of sight for warfare.

The Battle of the Somme also has the distinction of being the first battle fought with tanks.[9] Tanks were still in the early stages of development and many broke down when used in September.


Episode Length: 00:45:00

Year: 2005

Episodes: 1


This documentary is available to watch for FREE on Planet Knowledge, a free to watch video on demand channel on Freeview HD (Channel 265), Youview, Samsung connected TV’s, selected smart TV’s, tablets and smartphones using Android or iOS.

  

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